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NMDA (N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid) NMDA receptor agonist

Catalog No.B1624
Size Price Stock Qty
10mM (in 1mL DMSO)
$80.00
In stock
50mg
$50.00
In stock

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Sample solution is provided at 25 µL, 10mM.

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Chemical structure

NMDA (N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid)

Related Biological Data

NMDA (N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid)

Biological Activity

Description NMDA(N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid)is a specific agonist of NMDA receptor
Targets NMDA receptor          
IC50            

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Chemical Properties

Cas No. 6384-92-5 SDF Download SDF
Chemical Name (2R)-2-(methylamino)butanedioic acid
Canonical SMILES CNC(CC(=O)O)C(=O)O
Formula C5H9NO4 M.Wt 147.13
Solubility Soluble in DMSO > 10 mM Storage Store at -20°C
Shipping Condition Evaluation sample solution : ship with blue ice.All other available size: ship with RT , or blue ice upon request
General tips For obtaining a higher solubility , please warm the tube at 37 ℃ and shake it in the ultrasonic bath for a while.Stock solution can be stored below -20℃ for several months.

Background

NMDA is an agonist of NMDA-receptor [1].

NMDA is a glutamate-like excitatory substance and is a particularly potent excitant. NMDA binds to NMDA-receptor and interacts with it. This interaction causes a conformational change in the receptor or associated membrane molecules, which opened pores to allow extracellular sodium ions to flow down their electrochemical gradient and depolarise the cell. However, NMDA is proved to be a poor substrate for the uptake transporters, suggesting that the excitatory effect could not be an indirect consequence of glutamate uptake. Besides that, NMDA is found to increase intracellular calcium and release arachidonic acid, both of which generate oxygen radicals, subsequently inducing neuronal death [1, 2].

References:
[1] Watkins JC, Jane DE. The glutamate story. Br J Pharmacol. 2006 Jan;147 Suppl 1:S100-8.
[2] Lafon-Cazal M, Pietri S, Culcasi M, Bockaert J. NMDA-dependent superoxide production and neurotoxicity. Nature. 1993 Aug 5;364(6437):535-7.